Monday, September 1, 2014

Internet?

We've been in contact with the satellite internet people, and that is now looking like our best (only?) option for internet. Even though Seaside and Eastlink won the contract almost ten years ago to ensure high speed internet to *all* rural residents of Nova Scotia ... we're apparently a little too rural for their tastes.

However, satellite turns out to be far less expensive than the last time I spoke with them, so it's looking possible. The only hold up is that we need to install (ahem ... *buy* and install ...) more solar panels. It's great that solar panels are becoming more affordable, but wouldn't it be great if we could drop the "more" and just call them "affordable"?

But I don't want to go another winter without access to all of you. This has taken a little bit longer than I had expected, like many things around here.

The exhaustion level is easing off, now that LCD is three months old. She has started sleeping all night, maybe half the time. I keep describing her as the "smilingest" baby I've ever seen. The first smiles that were clearly in response to stimulus were within her first week (when her poor parents were half dead with the flu!), and now she laughs and smiles frequently.

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Good Things Are Coming

I almost hesitate to tell you, just in case something goes wrong ...

All I'm going to say is that we have some plans in the works and GOOD things are coming later this week. :) Well, I think so, anyway. And I think many of you will be pleased.

Aren't I just the most stinking rotten tease?

In other news, my friend L from Ontario, and her husband, took the train all the way down here to spend the weekend with us and help us finish the barn. We have just had the most wonderful weekend. We had a lobster dinner at home (They said it was "Good but not $55 good!"), then I fried Cameron Oatmeal Pudding (it's like a haggis ... without the meat). They spent an afternoon picking blueberries, which we canned and sent home with them. Yesterday we visited a Mennonite church around here and I got to share my "old" good friends with my "new" good friends - something I always love doing. And today we had cod cakes and baked beans for lunch - a very Maritime meal, indeed! They are now headed on a bus tour of Cape Breton Island and PEI. 
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Friday, August 29, 2014

We Like It!

I am not a vegetable lover. Like my youngest son, nicknamed Starvation, my 'go to' vegetables are basically cucumber, corn, potatoes ... maybe carrots if they aren't in big pieces (Or if they're roasted. Roasted carrots are amazing) and sometimes lettuce. My tastes are slightly broader - I'll eat baby greens, and I've been known to enjoy a properly cooked bit of turnip or zucchini. Really wild, strong flavours there, hm?

Anyway, we have discovered ...

We LOVE kale. Strip the leaves from the stems and set the leafy part aside for salad. Dice the stems and saute them in butter until soft. Add to anything - soup, omelet, fried potatoes. Go wild. They're delicious. And the chopped leaves are great, too. Starvation will eat them raw but not cooked.

Kohlrabi - Ok, the seed catalogs say that it's like a turnip that grows above ground, but it's not. It looks weird at first, but then you peel it ... and it looks like a potato. But it smells like cabbage. But it slices like a potato, and if sauted (YES, I like sauteing, and I use butter), it dissolves. The flavour is mildly cabbagey.  Yummy. It also makes great coleslaw. Mr. D wants you to know that. Just grate it and add mayo or coleslaw sauce.

Lambsquarters - this is a wild green that grows everywhere, especially if the soil has been disturbed. It's also called wild spinach, and that's a good description. But it tastes nicer than spinach, and it doesn't need to be cultivated, and it's free. From spring through until frost, lambsquarters that are young enough to taste good (under a foot tall) should be easy to find.

Tiny cucumbers brought in from the garden and sliced, then eaten immediately are the CRUNCHIEST thing in the world. I'm having trouble gathering enough to pickle.

Broccoli and cauliflower just cut from the garden - my children seem to confuse this with candy, and they fight over it. (Me, I like my cauliflower pickled, and there is just no way that I like to eat broccoli. However, if it goes to flower, it's really pretty!)

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